Seminar Timetable

9.30 am – 9.50 am  
“What does research prove” (Workshop Area)
Panel:
Presentation by: Euan Hart, Regional Manager with Caltech- Crystalyx. This will focus on the extensive research Crystalyx has carried out over the last two decades, and the quantifiable results that have been seen when feeding sheep with Crystalyx feed blocks.
10.00 am – 10.20 am
“One small step for “ewe”, one giant leap for your flock” (Workshop Area)
Panel:
Presentation by: Bridget Girvan BVM&S MRCVS, MSD Animal Health vet advisors -  UK sheep farmers continue to make progress towards stamping out lameness in the national flock. Since the publication of the Farm Animal Welfare Council (FAWC) ‘Opinion on Sheep Lameness’ report in March 2011, the industry has made great strides but must maintain momentum if it is to hit a target of less than 2% disease incidence in the national flock by 2021. The later summer months are a great time to consider implementing the proven Five-Point Plan for lameness reduction, hence the focus on this frustrating & counter-productive condition throughout July and early August. Developed by independent farm-based research and development organisation FAI Farms, the Five-Point Plan has been shown to deliver improvements on UK sheep farms where it has been adopted as part of their management programme. Implemented correctly and given long-term commitment, the Five-Point Plan offers sheep producers a clear lameness management strategy and a practical protocol for reducing the incidence of this costly problem, because: •             It builds natural disease resilience within the flock •             It reduces the disease challenge and spread on the farm •             It improves flock immunity through vaccination The Five-Point Plan builds a flock’s resilience to disease through culling persistently lame animals, reduces the infection challenge on the farm and establishes immunity through vaccination - sheep lameness nationally would be dramatically reduced if more farmers adopted it However, farmers are quite often unsure how to get started, but by using a simple Lameness Control Planner, priorities can be identified to enable that first step to be taken and join the march towards the 2% lameness target.  If you are struggling to reduce lameness in your own flock, there’s plenty of support and local help available to help you make that step change towards better long-term control. Sheep producers interested in implementing the Five-Point Plan on their own farm should contact their local vet or animal health adviser and ask for help from a qualified Lameness Reduction Adviser. A warm welcome awaits you, come and visit the MSD Stand to find out more.
10.30 am – 10.50 am
“Combining the best nutrition and management with epigenetics to shape the future of sheep” (Workshop Area)
Panel:
Presentation by: Harbro’s David Mackenzie, beef and sheep director and Jill Hunter beef & sheep nutritionist. 
11.00 am – 11.55 am 
“Lamb Trade & Marketing in a climate of in/decision” (Seminar Building)
Chairman:
John Fyall, Immediate Past NSA Scotland Chairman
Panel:
Scott Donaldson, President, Institute of Auctioneers & Appraiser Scotland;  Mike Gooding, Director, Farmers Fresh & Jonny Williams, Senior Livestock Procurement Officer, Farm Stock (Scotland) Ltd.
11:40 am – 12:10pm
“Practical guide to soil health, grass utilisation and genetics – joining the dots to make money” (Workshop Area)
Panel:
Presentation by: Emily Grant, former grassland co-ordinator at QMS & a representative from Innovis genetic team. -  Innovis established a sheep breeding program in 2006 to supply performance recorded, forage reared rams to progressive farmers. The program has grown over the years to its current level of 10,000 recorded ewes across 22 sites across the UK, with 2,300 rams available for sale in 2019.  Customers using the genetics often change their farming system to place more focus on forage based diets and take a different view on the land that they farm. Emily Grant, former grassland co-ordinator at Quality Meat Scotland, will lead farmers through soil structure, bio-diversity and health and its crucial role in production.  Straight after will be practical demonstrations on how to measure and use what we grow with a specific focus on grass as our cheapest form of feed for livestock.  The pros and cons of sub-division and grazing height will be a key topic for discussion in an informal and interactive format. The last part of the workshop will be presented by the Innovis genetics team and will demonstrate how Innovis measure and select for traits that enable sheep to perform on forage based systems. How and when data is captured will be explained and the process of turning this information into breeding values for specific traits. There will be a practical demonstration on how to make sense of performance information and the use of electronic ID and DNA for parentage assignment. The importance of evaluating sheep in a commercial environment will also be discussed along with ram growing and preparation to cover large number of ewes. Some of Innovis’ customers will also be present at the workshop in order to share their first-hand experience on how changing genetics and systems have changed their approach to farming and more importantly, their bottom line.  Innovis also have a stand (number 68) at the event next to the workshop area with staff on hand to provide further information about the genetics. The Innovis breedlines will be available to view on the stand. The workshop will identify key areas for farmers to focus on within their business and demonstrate where there is a return on investment.
12.10 pm – 12.30 pm
“Selecting prime lambs” (Workshop Area)
Panel:
Presentation/Demonstration by: Robert Gilchrist and Declan Marren of the Farm Profit Programme and Colin Slessor Deputy Head of Livestock, ANM Group. - A hands on practical demonstration and discussion, drawing prime lambs.
12.30 pm – 12.50 pm
“What does research prove” (Workshop Area)
Panel:
Presentation by: Euan Hart, Regional Manager with Caltech- Crystalyx - Repeat of morning session.
1.00 pm - 1.45 pm
“Impact on Brexit in relationship to the Scottish Sheep Industry” (Seminar Building)
Chairman:
Jennifer Craig, NSA Scotland Chair
Panel:
Jeremy Moody CAAV Secretary and Adviser.
1.30 pm – 1.50 pm
“One small step for “ewe”, one giant leap for your flock” (Workshop Area)
Panel:
Presentation by: Bridget Girvan BVM&S MRCVS, MSD Animal Health vet advisors. - Repeat of morning session.
2.00 pm – 2.20 pm
“Combining the best nutrition and management with epigenetics to shape the future of sheep” (Workshop Area)
Panel:
Presentation by: Harbro’s David Mackenzie, beef and sheep director and Jill Hunter beef & sheep nutritionist. - Repeat of morning session.
3.10 pm – 3.40 pm
“Practical guide to soil health, grass utilisation and genetics – joining the dots to make money” (Workshop Area)
Panel:
Presentation by: Emily Grant, former grassland co-ordinator at QMS & a representative from Innovis genetic team.
3.40 pm – 4.00 pm
“Selecting prime lambs” (Workshop Area)
Panel:
Presentation/Demonstration by: Robert Gilchrist and Declan Marren of the Farm Profit Programme and Colin Slessor Deputy Head of Livestock, ANM Group. - A hands on practical demonstration and discussion, drawing prime lambs.
3.25 pm - 3.45 pm  
“Meet the Farmer Q & A” (Seminar Building)
Chairman:
Willie Budge, SAC Consulting & NSA Highlandsheep 2019 Event Chairman.
Panel:
  Stephen Sutherland, Sibmister & Stainland Farms.